Canada: A Good Place for Pharmaceutical Manufacturing, No Matter Where You Are

Posted by Sam Ricchezza

Canada’s pharmaceutical sector is one of the country’s most innovative industries. Comprised of companies developing new and generic prescription pharmaceuticals and biopharmaceuticals as well as over-the-counter drug products, the sector also includes contract research organizations (CROs) and contract development and manufacturing organizations (CDMOs) such as WellSpring. A lucrative market in its own right, Canada claims a 2.5 percent share of the global pharmaceutical market, making it the ninth largest in the world (IMS Health Pharmafocus 2018).

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Topics: Partner Relationships

CMO Selection: Going from "Could Fit" To "Good Fit"

Posted by David Watt

Where does one start? For most drug owners seeking contract manufacturing support, it all depends on the type of product that they have. There’s always a set of established criteria, but there are a few other things for partner-seeking companies to look at, but it really depends on the mix and the philosophy of the organization, their cost sensitivity, price sensitivity, how aggressive they want to be, etc.

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Topics: Partner Relationships

Finding A Contract Manufacturing Partner That Fits

Posted by David Watt

Any journey of discovery begins with the first step and so it goes when seeking manufacturing and contract services partners. The likely goal of course is to find partners that “fit,” but getting to whatever constitutes a “good” fit relative to your organization is a process that one should start with a bit of introspection; sort of like “you can’t have a good relationship with someone else until you know who you really are first.”

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Topics: Partner Relationships

3 Common Problems Between Pharmaceutical Companies and Contract Manufacturing Organizations (CMOs)

Posted by Sam Ricchezza

pharma-companies-supplier-relationshipsIt is not uncommon for pharmaceutical companies to come to us looking to change their CMO relationship, usually due to a relationship issue that goes unchecked by both sides.  When issues are not highlighted by either the client or the CMO and tabled for discussion at the appropriate time, they tend to fester and irritate one side, the other or both.  You can tell when a relationship begins to sour, usually by the lack of responsiveness in communication or uncooperativeness in dealing with project tasks or quality-related items.  When this begins to happen, don’t be too surprised if a client starts looking for alternative supply sources.

From our experience, there are really three main sources of relationship problems between clients and CMO’s. These are:

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Topics: Partner Relationships